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Elliot Olsen has more than two decades of experience representing people harmed by Escherichia coli, and he has regained millions of dollars in compensation. If you or a family member were sickened by E. coli after eating ground beef or pork involved in this meat products recall, please call 612-337-6126, or complete the following:

A meat products recall affects almost 15,000 pounds of ground beef and pork products because of their potential to be contaminated with E. coli, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA) announced.

Interstate Meat Distributors of Clackamas, OR, recalled the meat products after a sample tested positive for E. coli, according to the USDA.

The products were shipped to retail locations in Oregon, Utah, and Washington. They bear establishment number “965” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

There have been no confirmed reports of “adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.”

meat products recall

Meat products recall affects nearly 15,000 pounds of ground beef and pork products by Interstate Meat Distributors (pictured) of Clackamas, Oregon.

Meat products recall:
Four products affected

The following products have been recalled by Interstate Meat Distributors:

  • 2.25-pound packages of fresh “All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef” containing package code 04118 and with 96 percent lean and 4 percent fat on the label.
  • 2.25-pound packages of fresh “All Natural Ground Beef Chuck” containing package code 04118 and with 80 percent lean and 20 percent fat on the label.
  • 2.25-pound packages of fresh “Ground Beef and Pork Blend” containing package code 04118 and with 80 percent lean and 20 percent fat on the label.
  • 2.50-pound bag containing 10 quarter-pound frozen “Brothers Choice 85% Lean Angus Ground Beef Patties” containing package code 04318.

The USDA advises that anyone who purchased the products to dispose of them or return them to the place of purchase.

Meat products recall:
E. coli explained

One of the most common causes of foodborne illness is produced by E. coli bacteria (Escherichia coli). The bacteria are normally found in the intestines of all mammals, and most strains are benign. Some strains, however, can cause serious illness, primarily through the eating of contaminated food.

Anyone can become infected by ingesting food contaminated with E. coli bacteria, but those with the highest risk of developing severe illness – or hemolytic uremic syndrome (see below), which can lead to kidney failure – include young children, senior citizens, and people with weakened immune systems.

E. coli signs and symptoms
As is the case with most foodborne illnesses, the symptoms of E. coli food poisoning are numerous:

  • nausea and vomiting
  • severe abdominal cramping
  • diarrhea, which can be bloody
  • fever and fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • decreased urination.

What is hemolytic uremic syndrome?
As many as 10 percent of people infected with E. coli illness develop hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS, which can be life-threatening. The overwhelming majority of HUS cases involve children under the age of 5, and the disease is the No. 1 cause of acute kidney failure for that age group.

HUS typically develops after a long bout with E. coli-produced diarrhea. The disease damages red blood cells, which can clog the kidney’s filters and cause kidney failure.

In severe cases, a kidney transplant might be necessary to avoid death.