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(612) 337-6126

Elliot Olsen’s experience representing people sickened by Listeria monocytogenes spans decades, and he has regained millions of dollars in compensation. If you or a family member contracted listeriosis and believe negligence played a role, please call (612) 337-6126, or complete the following:

A Whole Foods cheese recall has been enacted voluntarily because the products could be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The recall affects four types of Explorateur French Triple Crème cheese sold at nine stores in six states.

According to the April 9 news release from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the issue was discovered after the Austin, TX-based supermarket chain was contacted by a distributor who discovered the cheese was tainted by the foodborne pathogen.

Whole Foods cheese recall

A Whole Foods cheese recall has been enacted for nine stores in six states because the product could be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Four types of Explorateur French Triple Crème cheese are affected.

Whole Foods cheese recall:
Explorateur French 
Triple Crème

The six states affected by the Whole Foods cheese recall are Arkansas, Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, and Texas. All of the products had “sell by” dates from 02/15/2018 through 04/03/2018.

The products and the stores in which they were sold:

* The products called “Explorateur French Triple Crème” were sold at the following Whole Foods stores with scale labels that begin with the PLU code 0294317:

  • 90 E. Putnam Avenue, Greenwich, CT
  • 222 Main Street, Madison, NJ
  • 701 Bloomfield Avenue, Montclair, NJ

* The products called “Explorateur Triple Crème French Cheese” were sold at the following Whole Foods stores with scale labels that begin with PLU code 203971:

  • 7245 Lake Street, River Forest, IL
  • 760 Waukegan Road, Deerfield, IL

* The products called “Explorateur” were sold at the following Whole Foods stores with scale labels that begin with PLU code 293693:

  • 753 Cerillos Road, Santa Fe, NM
  • 100 Pitt Street, El Paso, TX

* The products called “Explorateur” in 8-ounce branded packages were sold at the following Whole Foods stores with UPC codes 339001000408 and lot codes H10, H010, H11 or H011:

  • 753 Cerillos Road, Santa Fe, NM
  • 100 Pitt Street, El Paso, TX
  • 7245 Lake Street, River Forest, IL
  • 760 Waukegan Road, Deerfield, IL
  • 501 Bowman Road, Little Rock, AR
  • 11920 Domain Drive, Austin, TX

Customers who purchased these products can return them with a valid receipt into stores for a full refund. Consumers with additional questions can call 1-844-936-8255 from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (CST) Monday through Friday, or 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (CST) Saturday and Sunday.

Whole Foods cheese recall:
Listeria facts and figures

Listeria monocytogenes is more commonly known simply as Listeria. It produces a serious and potentially fatal infection called listeriosis.

Statistics compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that about 1,600 people contract listeriosis each year in the U.S., and about 260 victims will die. The estimate makes Listeria the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning in the United States.

Who is at the greatest risk?
Listeriosis is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborn babies, older adults (65 and up), and people with weakened immune systems.

Pregnant women are 10 times more likely to contract Listeria, and older adults are four times more likely. According to the CDC, more than half of all Listeria infections occur in people 65 and older.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms of listeriosis can include headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, and convulsions. Fever and muscle aches also can occur.

Pregnant women typically experience only fever and other flu-like symptoms (fatigue, muscle aches). Infections during pregnancy, however, can lead to premature delivery, miscarriage, stillbirth, or a life-threatening infection of the baby.

What foods are affected?
Listeria can be found in raw milk and foods made from raw milk. It also can be found in food processing plants, and it can contaminate a variety of processed meats.

Listeria is unlike many other germs because it can grow in cold temperatures. That’s why refrigeration is no guarantee against it. The bacteria is killed only by cooking high-risk meats to the proper internal temperature (165 degrees fahrenheit) and pasteurization.

According to foodsafety.gov, some of the types of foods that can be contaminated by Listeria are:

  • ready-to-eat deli meats and hot dogs
  • refrigerated pâtés and meat spreads
  • unpasteurized (raw) milk and dairy products
  • soft cheese made with raw milk, such as queso fresco, feta, brie, and Camembert
  • refrigerated smoked seafood
  • raw sprouts.